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November 15, 2017

Brasilian HC14 and HC16 National Championship Regatta

Day 1
Last week, the truck started the long journey from Fortaleza, in the State of Ceara, south to Porto Alegre, in the State of Rio Grande do Sul, host of the championship regata. Traveling more than 4,200 kilometers, the truck picked up boats from the States of Ceara, Paraiba, Pernambuco, Sergipe, Bahia, Espirito Santo, and Sao Paulo. Finally, on Friday, the long journey ended at the Jangadeiros Yacht Club in Porto Alegre, in the State of Rio Grande do Sul, the southernmost state in Brasil.

The sky in Porto Alegre was bright and warm for the first day of the Brasilian HC14 and HC16 National Championship, locally known as Brascat. As the more than 100 sailors raised their brilliantly colored sails, the anticipation and adrenaline grew. Unfortunately, the winds were not as brilliant, and did not build. At the end of the day, thermal activity created enough wind for a single race.

The gun for the first race sounded at 5:30 and by 8:00 PM all sailors had returned to the Jangadeiros Yacht Club. Following are the results after the first day:

Hobie 16

1. Claudio Teixeira/Bruno Oliveira
2. Andre Montenegro/Juliana Baino
3. Joao Kramer/Lawson Beltrame
4. Daniel Azevedo/Fransisco Souza
5. Felipe Frey/Icaro Macena
6. Mario Dubeux/Karoline Bauermann
7. Carlos Sodre/Licinio Mendes
8. Ricardo Halla/Marcela Mendes
9. Igor Guimaraes/Ronaldo Moraes
10. Claudio Silva (Mika)/Fabio Pillar

Hobie 14

1. Adam Mayerle
2. Eduardo da Silva
3. Sebastiao Gomes
4. Klaus Muller
5. Alderson Pacheco

Day 2
The second day of the Brasilian National Championship HC 14 and HC16 regatta, locally know as Brascat, started with zero clouds in the sky, and zero wind on the water.

The Jangadeiros Yacht Club is located on the Guaiba River in the State of Rio Grande do Sul. Rio Grande do Sul is the southernmost state in Brasil. To the North, you can find the State of Santa Catarina. To the South, lies Uruguay. To the West, you can visit Paraguay, and to the East, across the Atlantic Ocean, one arrives in Africa.

Located 97 kilometers from the Atlantic Ocean, wind is principally generated by weather fronts or thermals, differences between the temperature of the land and the Guaiba River. By the middle of the afternoon of the second day, the elevated temperatures of 38 Celsius created thermal differences, which brought a refreshing breeze to the race course. The race committee quickly sent the competitors out.

The first race, with the thermal winds still building, raised adrenaline levels. Perhaps a bit too high, as several protests were registered in the first race. Unfortunately, as the land/water temperature differences fell, so did the wind. The second race was marked by all sailors chasing light wind puffs. By the third race, the wind direction became less certain as it shifted from East to West in a matter of minutes, and, shortly thereafter, back again. Back onshore, the racers called the third race a lottery.

After the second day, the results are:

Hobie 16

1. Andre Montenegro/Juliana Baino
2. Felipe Frey/Icaro Macena
3. Daniel Azevedo/Fransisco Souza
4. Jose R de Jesus/Marina S de Jesus
5. Joao Kramer/Lawson Beltrame
6. Claudio Teixeira/Bruno Oliveira
7. Claudio Cardoso/Mequias V de Queiroz
8. Ricardo Halla/Marcela Mendes
9. Mario Dubeux/Karoline Bauermann
10. Claudio Silva (Mika)/Fabio Pillar

Hobie 14

1. Adam Mayerle
2. Eduardo da Silva
3. Sebastiao Gomes
4. Klaus Muller
5. Alderson Pacheco